Many of our Elements Festival makers work to commission, producing beautifully crafted items for specific purposes or events, each tailored to the buyer’s requirements. In this post we take a look at 5 of their extraordinary creations.

 

untitled-design1Rebecca Joselyn – Packaging for the World’s Most Expensive Coffee
Rebecca was commissioned by Terra Nerra to produce a fitting packaging for the luxury Uchunari coffee, which was to be sold exclusively in Harrods.
Uchunari coffee is passed through the digestive tract of the civet cat and is produced in only very small quantities, around 45kgs per year.
Rebecca designed this stunning coffee bag made from Britannia Silver and 24ct gold plating, complete with a personalised engraving for each customer. Rebecca’s distinctive design is apparent in her unique take on the humble coffee sack and this luxurious bag is perfectly suited to its exclusive contents.

Rebecca joined us at Elements Festival for the first time in 2016 with her stunning silverware.

 

 

untitled-design1Sarah Hutchison – Menorah and Candlesticks
Sarah was commissioned to create this pair of candlesticks, which features key buildings in Israel, as well as this stunning and unusual menorah.
The candlesticks produce a beautifully silhouetted skyline when lit and a glowing, gold interior. Sarah’s menorah incorporates her signature fringing technique, which featured in her Silver of the Stars teapot. The strands are made from silver with silver gilt edges and Sarah shapes each one individually by hand.

2016 was Sarah’s second year at Elements Festival where she sold her beautiful silver and jewellery.

 
untitled-design2Angus McFadyen – Ceremonial Mace
This Mace was made by for Manchester Metropolitan University to commemorate the 175th anniversary of the Manchester School of Art. It was fabricated using many techniques and Angus describes it as quite a complicated construction job. The surface of the main body is engraved with imagery from a design by Lewis F Day, an important decorative artist and industrial designer from the end of the nineteenth/start of the twentieth century, who taught at the Art School.

Angus joined us for the first time at Elements Festival with his engraved silverware.

 

 

 

Bruntitled-design2ett Payne – Honeycomb Dish
This Honeycomb Dish was commissioned by the Duchess of Devonshire to display frames of honeycomb from her bee hives on the Chatsworth Estate in Derbyshire. The piece was hand-made in solid sterling silver; it is designed to hold the wooden honeycomb frame above a concave dish which reflects the colours of the honeycomb and catches the honey when the comb is cut. The dish itself is accompanied by two life-sized 18ct gold honey bee pins, which can be used to decorate the comb before it is served.

Brett Payne brought his contemporary silver pieces to Elements Festival for the second year.

 

 

 

untitled-design3Karen Wallace – Gun Engraving for Dickson & MacNaughton
Dickson & MacNaughton is the sole survivor of a long and proud tradition of Edinburgh gun making. Recently the company commissioned a gun to be engraved by Karen Wallace, jeweller, silversmith and hand engraver. Karen was mentored by experienced gun engraver Peter Cusack and created a fascinating finished piece.
The techniques and equipment involved in hand engraving have changed very little when compared to examples of engraving from over 500 years ago. The resulting piece is a beautifully engraved gun, which combines traditional skills with a beautifully intricate celtic design.

Karen is a returning exhibitor at Elements Festival, she creates hand engraved silverware and jewellery.

(Photo Credits: Ceremonial Mace – Manchester Metropolitan University / Rebecca Joselyn Coffee Packaging – Oakes Studios / Brett Payne Honeycomb Dish – Jerry Lampson).

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